Cults were deep into the process of recording their fourth full-length LP when singer Madeline Follin let a secret slip. At the time, it seemed inconsequential, just a passing comment amongst friends, but in the end, it would prove to be a monumental revelation, one that would change the acclaimed New York duo forever. "In the past, I'd never brought my own music to the table because I was just too shy," says Follin, "but at some point during the sessions, I mentioned that I'd been writing some songs on the side, and our producer, Shane Stoneback, asked me to share them." "When Shane and I heard what Madeline had written, we couldn't believe it," says multi-instrumentalist/singer Brian Oblivion. "The music just floored us." What followed was a radical reimagining, both of the band's sound and it's dynamic, and the result is Cults' utterly mesmerizing new album, 'Host.' Written more collaboratively than ever before and recorded primarily with live instruments for the first time, the collection marks the start of a bold new chapter for the band, one fueled by an ever-deepening trust and a boundless appetite for growth and experimentation. The songs here are deceptively charming, with lush, airy arrangements that belie their dark, weighty lyrics, and the production is rich and multifaceted to match, blending retro and futuristic palettes into a spellbinding swirl of high-def indie rock and lo-fi bedroom pop. As it's title suggests, 'Host' is an exploration of the sinister dynamics at play in a parasitic relationship, but rather than dwell in the discomfort, the record charts a cathartic journey towards freedom and self-reliance, reveling in the power that comes from standing your ground and declaring independence in the face of exploitation and manipulation. "Writing these songs helped me learn to be okay with putting myself out there, with having the confidence to express what I want and what I won't accept when it comes to personal relationships," says Follin. "In a funny sort of way, the music helped me find my voice in the band, too."

Cults were deep into the process of recording their fourth full-length LP when singer Madeline Follin let a secret slip. At the time, it seemed inconsequential, just a passing comment amongst friends, but in the end, it would prove to be a monumental revelation, one that would change the acclaimed New York duo forever. "In the past, I'd never brought my own music to the table because I was just too shy," says Follin, "but at some point during the sessions, I mentioned that I'd been writing some songs on the side, and our producer, Shane Stoneback, asked me to share them." "When Shane and I heard what Madeline had written, we couldn't believe it," says multi-instrumentalist/singer Brian Oblivion. "The music just floored us." What followed was a radical reimagining, both of the band's sound and it's dynamic, and the result is Cults' utterly mesmerizing new album, 'Host.' Written more collaboratively than ever before and recorded primarily with live instruments for the first time, the collection marks the start of a bold new chapter for the band, one fueled by an ever-deepening trust and a boundless appetite for growth and experimentation. The songs here are deceptively charming, with lush, airy arrangements that belie their dark, weighty lyrics, and the production is rich and multifaceted to match, blending retro and futuristic palettes into a spellbinding swirl of high-def indie rock and lo-fi bedroom pop. As it's title suggests, 'Host' is an exploration of the sinister dynamics at play in a parasitic relationship, but rather than dwell in the discomfort, the record charts a cathartic journey towards freedom and self-reliance, reveling in the power that comes from standing your ground and declaring independence in the face of exploitation and manipulation. "Writing these songs helped me learn to be okay with putting myself out there, with having the confidence to express what I want and what I won't accept when it comes to personal relationships," says Follin. "In a funny sort of way, the music helped me find my voice in the band, too."

858458007207

Details

Format: Vinyl
Label: SINDERLYN
Rel. Date: 09/18/2020
UPC: 858458007207

Host [Indie Exclusive Limited Edition Evergreen LP]
Artist: Cults
Format: Vinyl
New: Available 22.98
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Available Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Trials
2. 8th Avenue
3. Spit You Out
4. A Low
5. No Risk
6. Working It Over
7. A Purgatory
8. Like I Do
9. Masquerading
10. Honest Love
11. Shoulders to My Feet
12. Monolithic

More Info:

Cults were deep into the process of recording their fourth full-length LP when singer Madeline Follin let a secret slip. At the time, it seemed inconsequential, just a passing comment amongst friends, but in the end, it would prove to be a monumental revelation, one that would change the acclaimed New York duo forever. "In the past, I'd never brought my own music to the table because I was just too shy," says Follin, "but at some point during the sessions, I mentioned that I'd been writing some songs on the side, and our producer, Shane Stoneback, asked me to share them." "When Shane and I heard what Madeline had written, we couldn't believe it," says multi-instrumentalist/singer Brian Oblivion. "The music just floored us." What followed was a radical reimagining, both of the band's sound and it's dynamic, and the result is Cults' utterly mesmerizing new album, 'Host.' Written more collaboratively than ever before and recorded primarily with live instruments for the first time, the collection marks the start of a bold new chapter for the band, one fueled by an ever-deepening trust and a boundless appetite for growth and experimentation. The songs here are deceptively charming, with lush, airy arrangements that belie their dark, weighty lyrics, and the production is rich and multifaceted to match, blending retro and futuristic palettes into a spellbinding swirl of high-def indie rock and lo-fi bedroom pop. As it's title suggests, 'Host' is an exploration of the sinister dynamics at play in a parasitic relationship, but rather than dwell in the discomfort, the record charts a cathartic journey towards freedom and self-reliance, reveling in the power that comes from standing your ground and declaring independence in the face of exploitation and manipulation. "Writing these songs helped me learn to be okay with putting myself out there, with having the confidence to express what I want and what I won't accept when it comes to personal relationships," says Follin. "In a funny sort of way, the music helped me find my voice in the band, too."